Governments play a critical role in the developing and implementing the laws, policies, and programs that are needed to prevent and respond to modern slavery. To complement the prevalence estimates and assessment of vulnerability, for the third year running the Global Slavery Index includes an assessment of the actions governments are taking to respond to modern slavery.

This assessment is based on tracking government progress towards the achievement of five milestones:

  1. Survivors of slavery are identified and supported to exit and remain out of slavery.
  2. Criminal justice mechanisms function effectively to prevent modern slavery.
  3. Coordination occurs at the national and regional level, and governments are held to account for their response.
  4. Risk factors such as attitudes, social systems, and institutions that enable modern slavery are addressed.
  5. Government and business stop sourcing goods and services produced by forced labour.

Theoretical framework: crime prevention theory

Our starting point for the assessment of government responses is situational crime prevention theory.1 This is based on the understanding that in order for the crime of modern slavery to occur, there needs to be a vulnerable victim, a motivated offender, and the absence of a capable guardian. It also recognises that crime does not happen in a vacuum, and that broad contextual factors like state instability, discrimination, and disregard of human rights are critical to any government response.

Figure 1Situational crime prevention theory
Situational crime prevention theory

Therefore, to reduce the prevalence of crime, the government needs to:

  • Reduce the opportunity for offenders to commit the crime.
  • Increase the risks of offending.
  • Decrease the vulnerability of potential victims.
  • Increase the capacity of law enforcement and other guardians.
  • Address the people or factors that enable or facilitate slavery.

Development of the conceptual framework

Using this theoretical framework as a starting point and drawing on the 2000 UN Trafficking Protocol,2 the 2014 Forced Labour Protocol (P029)3 and the 2005 European Convention on Action against Trafficking Beings,4 as well as on literature on effective responses to modern slavery,5 we devised a conceptual framework of what constitutes a strong response to modern slavery. It is organised around the five milestones outlined above, which, if achieved, would ensure that governments are taking steps to address modern slavery. The conceptual framework was developed in consultation with an independent Expert Working Group and is based on findings from NGO research and scholars in fields related to modern slavery, such as harmful traditional practices, health, social welfare, and migration.6 The full conceptual framework can be found in Table 8.

Process

In 2018, data was collected for 181 countries for the government response component of the Index. For the first time, we have included data on 53 Commonwealth countries in our government response database.7 As data for the smaller island nations of the Commonwealth were limited, we have not provided an overall rating for these individual countries. Due to ongoing conflict and extreme disruption to government, we have not included ratings for Afghanistan, Iraq, South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen this year.8

The five milestones underpinning the conceptual framework are then broken down into activities, which are further disaggregated into indicators. There is a total of 104 indicators in the conceptual framework and 28 activities. The breakdown by milestone is described in Table 1 below.

Table 1Breakdown of milestones into activities and indicators
MilestoneNo. of activitiesNo. of indicators
Survivors of slavery are identified and supported to exit and remain out of slavery931
Criminal justice mechanisms function effectively to prevent modern slavery633
Coordination occurs at the national and regional level, and governments are held to account for their response410
Risk factors such as attitudes, social systems, and institutions that enable modern slavery are addressed719
Government and business stop sourcing goods and services produced by forced labour211
Total:28*104

* Taiwan and Kosovo have 27 activities, not 28, as they are unable to ratify international conventions.

Data collection

Data are collected at the indicator level, where each indicator describes an element of an activity. Take activity 2.1 under milestone 1, “A reporting mechanism exists where modern slavery crimes can be reported,” as an example:

Table 2Activity 2.1, Milestone 1
Milestone 1:
Survivors of slavery are identified and supported to exit and remain out of slavery
Activity: A reporting mechanism exists where modern slavery crimes can be reportedIndicators
2.1.1 A reporting mechanism exists
2.1.2 Reporting mechanism is available for men, women, and children
2.1.3 Reporting mechanism is free to access
2.1.4 Reporting mechanism operates 24/7
2.1.5 Reporting mechanism operates in multiple languages or has capacity to provide immediate access to bring in translators

There are five indicators under this activity, each of which determines the existence of the reporting mechanism and how well it is operating. Desk research was conducted for these indicators and others in the conceptual framework by a team of 37 researchers and research assistants following a strict protocol that described both the types of reports and sources to be reviewed and what constitutes “relevant” information. The multilingual team9 conducted research either by country or by indicator and saved these references in the government response database.10

These data points were then verified, as far as possible, by NGO contacts within each country. NGOs were given the opportunity to either respond via email, hold Skype interviews, or complete a survey. More than 60 survey responses were received, and a further 51 NGOs responded to individual requests for information via email or via Skype.

Rating

Ninety of the 104 indicators in the conceptual framework are what we have called “positive indicators.” Put simply, these cover the actions the government is taking to achieve each activity and milestone. For example, the indicators described in Table 2 are all positive indicators.

These indicators are supplemented by 14 standardised “negative indicators,” which attempt to measure implementation of a particular activity. For example, if shelters exist for modern slavery victims, the negative indicator “victims are detained and unable to leave the shelter” would capture whether victims are detained and experience secondary victimisation despite the existence of these shelters. The negative indicators also cover broader factors, which if conducted by governments would increase the risk of human trafficking and child exploitation. These include state-sanctioned forced labour, high levels of government complicity, criminalisation of victims, deportation of potential victims, and policies that tie migrant workers to their employers.

All 14 negative indicators can be roughly divided into two categories; those actions that have a negative impact on identified victims of modern slavery, and those policies or laws that enable or facilitate modern slavery to occur.

Table 3Example of negative implementation indicators, Activity 3.1, Milestone 1
Milestone 1:
Survivors of slavery are identified and supported to exit and remain out of slavery
Activity 3.1: Victim determined support is available for all identified victimsIndicators:
3.1.1 Victim support services are available for suspected victims of modern slavery (men, women, and children where relevant)
3.1.2 NEGATIVE Suspected victims are held in shelters against their will and do not have a choice about whether or not to remain in a shelter
3.1.3 Government contributes to the operational costs of the shelters and there are no significant resource gaps
3.1.4 Physical and mental health services are provided to victims of modern slavery
3.1.5 NEGATIVE Victim support services are not available for all victims of modern slavery
3.1.7 NEGATIVE No victims have accessed the services or shelters
Table 414 negative indicators, grouped by type of indicator
Policies or laws that have negative impact on identified victims of modern slaveryPolicies or laws that facilitate the occurrence of modern slavery
M1 2.2.4 There is evidence that police officers have not identified victims of modern slavery in the last 12 monthsM2 1.2.7 Criminal laws have disproportionate penalties
M1 3.1.2 Suspected victims do not have a choice about whether or not to remain in a shelterM2 3.1.3 Specialist police units do not have necessary resources to be able to operate effectively
M1 3.1.5 Victim support services are not available for all victims of modern slaveryM2 3.2.5 Judicial punishments are not proportionate to severity of the crime and complicity of the offender.
M1 3.1.7 No victims have accessed the services or shelters since 1st March 2016M4 1.4.3 Complicity in modern slavery cases is widespread and not investigated
M2 1.4.5 There is evidence that victims of modern slavery have been treated as criminals for conduct that occurred while under control of criminalsM4 1.6.7 Patterns of abuse of labour migrants are widespread and unchecked
M3 3.2.4 Foreign victims are not identified AND/ OR are detained and deportedM4 1.6.9 There are laws or policies that prevent or make it difficult for workers to leave abusive employers without punishment

M4 1.7.5 Diplomatic staff are not investigated or prosecuted for alleged complicity or abuse in modern slavery cases.

M4 1.8.1 State-sanctioned forced labour exists

Once data had been collected and verified, each indicator was scored on a 0 to 1 scale. On this scale, 0 meant no information was identified or available, or information explicitly demonstrated that the government did not meet any indicators; 1 meant that the indicator had been met. Negative indicators were scored on a 0 to -1 scale. On this scale, 0 meant no information was identified or available, or information explicitly demonstrated that the government did not meet any indicators; -meant that the indicator had been met. As an advocacy tool, we have retained our rating where no information found is rated as 0. However, in the government response database, we have identified those indicators for which we have consistently since 2014 failed to identify any information.

The data and ratings then went through a series of quality checks – first by country, where each country was reviewed against the rating descriptions to determine if ratings were sound. Then, following data collection, each indicator was reviewed across all countries to check for consistency in the applied logic. Any edits were then reviewed before final edits were made in the database.

The data were then exported to an Excel spreadsheet and the final scoring applied. Each activity is weighted equally so that a country can obtain a total of 28 points. This does lead to an implicit weighting of milestones, where the more activities in a milestone, the more weight the milestone is given. Table 5 describes the implicit milestone weightings. Two negative indicators (widespread, un-investigated official complicity in modern slavery cases and state-imposed forced labour) were then subtracted from the total. The final score was presented as a percentage, which was then converted into a rating, based on equal increments of 10 (Table 6). Finally, any government that was found to have any negative indicators was capped at a BBB rating.

Table 5Implicit weighting of each milestone
MilestoneNo. of activitiesPercentage weight
Survivors of slavery are identified and supported to exit and remain out of slavery932%
Criminal justice mechanisms function effectively to prevent modern slavery621%
Coordination occurs at the national and regional level, and governments are held accountable for their response414%
Risk factors such as attitudes, social systems and institutions that enable modern slavery are addressed725%
Government and business stop sourcing goods and services that use modern slavery27%
Total:28*100%**

* Taiwan and Kosovo have 27 activities, not 28, as they are unable to ratify international conventions.

**Percentages add to total of 99% due to rounding

Table 6Rating descriptions
AAA90 to 100The government has implemented an effective and comprehensive response to all forms of modern slavery, with effective emergency and long-term reintegration victim support services, a strong criminal justice framework, high levels of coordination and collaboration, measures to address all forms of vulnerability, and strong government procurement policies and legislation to ensure that slavery is not present in business supply chains. There is no evidence of criminalisation or deportation of victims.
AA80 to 89.9The government has implemented a comprehensive response to most forms of modern slavery, with strong victim support services, a robust criminal justice framework, demonstrated coordination and collaboration, measures to address vulnerability, and government procurement guidelines and/or supply chain policies or legislation to ensure that slavery is not present in business supply chains.
A70 to 79.9The government has implemented key components of a holistic response to modern slavery, with strong victim support services, a strong criminal justice framework, demonstrated coordination and collaboration, measures to address vulnerability, and may have taken action to ensure that government procurement policies do not encourage slavery and/or supply chain policies or legislation to ensure that slavery is not present in business supply chains.
BBB60 to 69.9The government has implemented key components of a holistic response to some forms of modern slavery, with victim support services, a strong criminal justice response, evidence of coordination and collaboration, and protections in place for vulnerable populations. Governments may be beginning to address slavery in supply chains of government procurement, or of businesses operating within their territory. There may be evidence that some government policies and practices may criminalise and/or cause victims to be deported.
BB50 to 59.9The government has introduced a response to modern slavery that includes short-term victim support services, a criminal justice framework that criminalises some forms of modern slavery, a body to coordinate the response, and protection for those vulnerable to modern slavery. There may be evidence that some government policies and practices may criminalise and/or cause victims to be deported and/or facilitate slavery.
B40 to 49.9The government has introduced a response to modern slavery with limited victim support services, a criminal justice framework that criminalises some forms of modern slavery (or has recently amended inadequate legislation and policies), a body or mechanisms that coordinate the response, and has policies that provide some protection for those vulnerable to modern slavery.
There is evidence that some government policies and practices may criminalise and/or deport victims and/or facilitate slavery. Services may be provided by International Organisations (IOs)/NGOs with international funding, sometimes with government monetary or in-kind support.
CCC30 to 39.9The government has a limited response to modern slavery, with limited victim support services, a criminal justice framework that criminalises some forms of modern slavery, and has policies that provide some protection for those vulnerable to modern slavery. There may be evidence of a National Action Plan and/or national coordination body. There may be evidence that some government policies and practices may criminalise and/or deport victims and/or facilitate slavery. Services may be largely provided by IOs/NGOs with international funding, with limited government funding or in-kind support.
CC20 to 29.9The government has a limited response to modern slavery, with largely basic victim support services, a limited criminal justice framework, limited coordination or collaboration mechanism, and few protections for those vulnerable to modern slavery. There may be evidence that some government policies and practices facilitate slavery. Services are largely provided by IOs/NGOs with limited government funding or in-kind support.
C10 to 19.9The government response to modern slavery is inadequate, with limited and/or few victim support services, a weak criminal justice framework, weak coordination or collaboration, while little is being done to address vulnerability. There are government practices and policies that facilitate slavery. Services, where available, are largely provided by IOs/NGOs with little government funding or in-kind support.
D<0 to 9.9The government has a wholly inadequate response to modern slavery, and/or there is evidence of government-sanctioned modern slavery. However, countries in this category may be experiencing high levels of poverty and internal conflict that may prevent or hinder a response to modern slavery.

Limitations

Collecting data for 104 indicators across 181 countries is a complicated undertaking. Access to data is limited for indicators where information is not publicly available or in languages spoken by the research team. The absence of Arabic and Portuguese speakers prevented verification with NGOs in countries where these are the primary languages spoken. Limits also remain in measuring the implementation of a response; while the negative indicators and NGO verification are the first steps in measuring this, more remains to be done in getting at the reality of what is occurring on the ground as opposed to what is reported publicly.

Comparability

The government response assessment is comparable to previous iterations of the Index. However, there are two caveats on this.

First, following the release of the 2016 Index we conducted a review of all indicators in the conceptual framework. This was to tighten up the rating descriptions to ensure consistency in the application of rating logic and to review the language of certain indicators and their rating descriptions. This led to various language edits to the indicators, which are available on request. During this review we re-examined milestone 5 against the UN Guiding Principles and the UK Modern Slavery Act, and we consulted a series of experts in the business and human rights field. Table 7 shows the 2016 indicators against the updated 2018 indicators.

Second, we altered our overall scoring to apply more weight to the two negative indicators on state-imposed forced labour (M4 1.8.1) and official complicity (M4 1.4.3). This gives both these indicators the same weight as “activities,” which is a slightly higher weight than in 2016. This is based on the premise that if a country is not taking action to tackle official complicity, or is itself complicit in forced labour, this undermines the entire government response.

Table 7Updated Milestone 5
Indicator 2016Indicator description 2016Indicator 2018Indicator description for GSI 2018
M5 1.1.2 Public procurement policies and systems exist to minimise the risk of governments purchasing products tainted by forced labour.The government drafts and implements public procurement policies that outline standards for public procurement, which explicitly prohibit using businesses suspected of using forced labour or purchasing products that were made using forced labour.
These policies will ideally have implementation guidelines and tools on how to establish compliance, such as conducting risk assessments and developing compliance plans, and a time period to establish compliance framework.
M5 1.1.1 (edited) Guidelines exist for public procurement officials.The government has drafted guidelines or an internal memo for public procurement officials that outline standards and/or operating procedures to prevent use of modern slavery in the purchase of public goods or services. These guidelines can include general guidelines on human rights that include sub-sections on modern slavery.
M5 1.1.2 Public procurement policies and systems exist to minimise the risk of governments purchasing products tainted by forced labour.The government drafts and implements public procurement policies that outline standards for public procurement, which explicitly prohibit using businesses suspected of using forced labour or purchasing products that were made using forced labour.
These policies will ideally have implementation guidelines and tools on how to establish compliance, such as conducting risk assessments and developing compliance plans, and a time period to establish compliance framework.
M5 1.1.2 (edited) Public procurement policies and systems exist to minimise the risk of governments purchasing products tainted by forced labour.The government drafts and implements public procurement policies that outline standards for public procurement, which explicitly prohibit using businesses suspected of using forced labour, or purchasing products that were made using forced labour. These policies can include inserting clauses in public contracts prohibiting the use of forced labour, not making purchasing decisions on price alone, steps to be taken should a contractor be found to use forced labour, or requiring government contractors over a certain value to maintain compliance plans.
M5 1.1.3 Annual reports on forced labour in government supply chains are produced and publicly available.If yes to 1.1.2, the government releases annual reports on implementation of the above laws or policies or releases information on levels of compliance at all stages of public procurement and this has to have occurred in the period from 1 June 2014 to 31 August 2015 or if the policy has just been adopted, it is enough that reporting is stipulated as part of regulating compliance.M5 1.1.3 (edited) Annual reports on government action to prevent use of forced labour in public procurement are produced and publicly available.The government releases reports on activities taken to prevent use of forced labour in public procurementANDThis has to have occurred since 30 June 2012OR If the policy has been adopted in the last two years (since 1 February 2015), it is enough that reporting is stipulated as part of regulating compliance. The report can also be on human rights, but include a sub-section on modern slavery


M5 1.1.4 (addition) The government has provided training to public procurement officials on modern slavery.The government has provided training to procurement officials on what is modern slavery, how it is relevant to their role and to existing government policies and their implementation. This training is provided face-to-face, or through online training modules, and has occurred at least once since 30 June 2012.


M5 1.1.5 (addition) There is evidence that the government has taken remedial action where forced labour has been discovered.There is evidence that the government has worked with contractors to implement corrective action plans for those who have identified issues with the use of forced labour or where the use of forced labour is prevalent and the contractor is unwilling to work with the government, there is evidence that the government has cancelled the contract and this has occurred since 30 June 2012.
M5 1.2.1 Laws or policies require businesses to report on their actions to implement risk minimisation policies.Legislation or policy requires businesses to report on their actions to minimise risk of forced labour in their supply chain.M5 2.1.1 (edited) Laws or policies require businesses to report on their actions to implement risk minimisation policies.Legislation or policies require business to report on their actions to minimise risk of forced labour in their supply chain. (For example, the UK Modern Slavery Act requires businesses earning over £36 million per annum to report on their actions to combat modern slavery.)


M5 2.1.2 (addition) Governments have identified high-risk sectors and taken action to work with these sectors to eradicate modern slavery.The government has collaborated with businesses to identify high-risk sectors and set up national sector-specific initiatives that support businesses to tackle modern slavery. These can be broader initiatives that include sustainability, health and safety, etc., but must include some elements of tackling modern slavery. (One example is the sustainable textile partnership in Germany.)
M5 1.2.2 Laws or policies require businesses to have transparent, risk-minimisation strategies in place that will identify and respond to a case of modern slavery in their supply chains.Legislation or policy requires businesses to have risk-minimisation policies to operate within the country.
The legislation or policy MUST have, or be supported by, guidelines on how to implement it and penalties for non-compliance.
M5 2.1.3 (edited) Laws or policies allow governments to create a public list of businesses who have been found to tolerate slavery in their supply chains.The government has worked with businesses and NGOs to create a public list of businesses that have been found to tolerate forced labour in their supply chains and/or these businesses are prevented from accessing public funds. (For example, the “Dirty List” in Brazil.)
M5 1.2.3 Governments implement a responsible investment reporting requirement for investment funds and banks headquartered in their country to ensure that investment does not support modern slavery.Investment funds and banks headquartered the country have to report on modern slavery risk in investments and reporting must occur at least every two years. If policy is in place, there must be evidence that this has occurred since 1 September 2010 or if the policy has just been adopted, it is enough that reporting is stipulated as part of regulating compliance.M5 2.1.4 (edited) The government implements a responsible investment reporting requirement for investment funds and banks headquartered in the country to ensure that investment does not support modern slavery.Investment funds and banks headquartered the country have to report on modern slavery risk in investments and reporting must occur at least every two years. If policy is in place, there mst be evidence that this has occurred since 30 June 2012 or if the policy has just been adopted, it is enough that reporting is stipulated as part of regulating compliance.


M2 2.1.5 (addition) Laws or policies prevent the import of goods and services made with forced labour.The government has prohibited the import of goods and services made with forced labour. (For example, the US Tariff Act.)
M5 1.2.4 Laws are in place that make it a criminal offence for company directors or companies to fail to prevent modern slavery from being utilised in their business’ first tier supply chain.If yes to 1.1.2 or 1.2.1, then:
Legislation has strict liability offences, meaning directors can be held accountable for slavery in first tier supply chains where policies do not exist
OR
Legislation has vicarious liability offences where a company can be held accountable for slavery in first tier supply chains where policies do not exist.
M2 2.1.6 (edited) Laws are in place that make it a criminal offence for company directors or companies to fail to undertake reasonable due diligence in first tier supply chains.Directors can be charged and prosecuted for slavery in first tier supply chains where it can be shown that due diligence has not occurred. This indicator measures the existence of this provision in legislation.
Table 8Government response rating by country
RatingCountrySupport survivorsCriminal justiceCoordinationAddress riskSupply chainsTOTAL

A

Netherlands

72.2

72.2

75.0

92.9

36.7

75.2

BBB*

United States

92.6

75.6

56.3

66.7

65.0

71.7

BBB*

United Kingdom

82.0

73.9

62.5

73.8

26.7

71.5

BBB

Sweden

73.1

64.4

81.3

73.8

18.3

68.7

BBB

Belgium

72.2

53.9

87.5

73.8

36.7

68.3

BBB

Croatia

77.0

78.3

56.3

69.0

18.3

68.2

BBB

Spain

79.3

65.6

62.5

73.8

0.0

66.9

BBB

Norway

68.1

82.8

56.3

73.8

10.0

66.8

BBB

Portugal

62.6

69.4

68.8

83.3

8.3

66.3

BBB

Montenegro

79.3

70.0

56.3

61.9

0.0

64.0

BBB

Australia

69.6

75.0

56.3

69.0

0.0

63.8

BBB

Cyprus

68.1

77.8

56.3

61.9

18.3

63.4

BBB

Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of

70.4

67.2

75.0

61.9

0.0

63.2

BBB

Austria

72.8

61.1

68.8

61.9

18.3

63.1

BBB

Georgia

74.1

63.9

56.3

69.0

0.0

62.8

BBB

Argentina

70.0

70.6

62.5

78.6

0.0

62.6

BBB

Chile

76.5

53.9

50.0

76.2

0.0

62.3

BBB

Italy

58.3

78.9

50.0

83.3

26.7

62.0

BBB

Serbia

63.9

75.0

56.3

69.0

0.0

61.9

BBB

France

42.4

71.7

93.8

71.4

18.3

61.5

BBB

Latvia

47.0

61.7

93.8

71.4

18.3

60.9

BBB

Switzerland

66.7

60.6

37.5

81.0

0.0

60.0

BB

Albania

72.8

63.3

68.8

66.7

0.0

59.9

BB

Slovenia

60.4

57.8

56.3

73.8

18.3

59.6

BB

Lithuania

46.3

62.8

68.8

78.6

18.3

59.1

BB

Canada

52.4

72.8

75.0

61.9

0.0

58.6

BB

Jamaica

50.6

72.8

75.0

64.3

0.0

58.6

BB

Denmark

62.6

56.1

50.0

69.0

28.3

58.6

BB

Hungary

64.8

47.2

56.3

71.4

18.3

58.2

BB

Dominican Republic

69.1

78.3

37.5

69.0

0.0

58.0

BB

Finland

53.7

49.4

81.3

71.4

8.3

57.9

BB

Ireland

65.9

42.2

62.5

69.0

18.3

57.7

BB

New Zealand

53.7

47.8

43.8

95.2

0.0

57.6

BB

Germany

61.7

57.8

56.3

57.1

36.7

57.1

BB

Bulgaria

59.8

49.4

56.3

66.7

18.3

55.8

BB

Philippines

51.5

69.4

50.0

69.0

0.0

55.8

BB

Moldova, Republic of

58.5

61.1

62.5

59.5

0.0

55.7

BB

Brazil

38.9

47.8

87.5

73.8

26.7

55.6

BB

Greece

68.5

66.1

43.8

45.2

18.3

55.1

BB

Kosovo

66.7

62.7

37.5

59.5

0.0

54.8

BB

Poland

53.3

42.2

68.8

69.0

8.3

53.9

BB

Armenia

54.6

51.1

56.3

66.7

0.0

53.2

BB

Slovakia

48.7

52.2

62.5

64.3

18.3

53.2

BB

Ukraine

65.7

46.1

62.5

66.7

0.0

53.0

BB

Czech Republic

47.0

54.4

81.3

50.0

28.3

52.9

BB

Peru

75.9

42.2

62.5

54.8

0.0

52.5

BB

Mexico

53.7

62.8

56.3

69.0

0.0

52.4

BB

Israel

57.2

56.1

43.8

61.9

0.0

52.1

BB

Indonesia

47.8

60.0

50.0

61.9

0.0

50.8

BB

Uruguay

40.6

49.4

50.0

78.6

0.0

50.4

BB

Costa Rica

53.7

41.7

62.5

59.5

0.0

50.0

B

Trinidad and Tobago

67.2

50.0

31.3

66.7

0.0

49.9

B

Thailand

46.3

51.7

56.3

73.8

0.0

48.9

B

Estonia

41.3

36.1

43.8

81.0

18.3

48.8

B

Bosnia and Herzegovina

60.2

47.8

25.0

76.2

0.0

48.6

B

Azerbaijan

28.0

71.7

62.5

59.5

0.0

48.2

B

Vietnam

62.2

45.0

62.5

66.7

0.0

48.1

B

United Arab Emirates

63.0

41.1

56.3

42.9

0.0

47.8

B

South Africa

53.7

61.7

43.8

57.1

0.0

47.4

B

Turkey

66.7

57.2

37.5

33.3

0.0

47.4

B

Senegal

49.6

43.9

56.3

54.8

0.0

47.1

B

Ecuador

61.1

55.6

37.5

52.4

0.0

46.4

B

Iceland

48.7

54.4

37.5

52.4

8.3

46.4

B

Nicaragua

34.4

70.0

25.0

66.7

0.0

46.3

B

Sierra Leone

53.7

37.8

50.0

54.8

0.0

46.2

B

Nigeria

58.9

53.3

50.0

47.6

0.0

45.8

B

India

46.3

53.3

56.3

45.2

0.0

45.7

B

Luxembourg

47.4

33.9

68.8

50.0

8.3

45.4

B

Guatemala

42.2

25.6

62.5

69.0

0.0

45.2

B

Bangladesh

43.1

63.3

68.8

42.9

0.0

44.4

B

Tunisia

53.0

31.7

43.8

57.1

0.0

44.3

B

Romania

53.3

52.2

50.0

42.9

18.3

43.9

B

Panama

32.6

60.0

31.3

78.6

0.0

43.9

B

Cote d'Ivoire

34.4

36.7

43.8

66.7

8.3

42.4

B

Uganda

48.1

51.7

37.5

54.8

0.0

42.0

B

Bolivia, Plurinational State of

21.3

43.9

62.5

61.9

8.3

41.3

B

Colombia

40.4

42.2

62.5

69.0

0.0

41.1

B

Kyrgyzstan

33.0

48.3

56.3

61.9

0.0

40.9

B

Paraguay

26.1

56.7

37.5

71.4

10.0

40.9

B

Mozambique

57.6

49.4

31.3

42.9

0.0

40.7

B

Belarus

48.9

27.8

37.5

66.7

0.0

40.1

B

Egypt

37.6

30.6

62.5

64.3

0.0

40.1

CCC

Haiti

49.6

42.8

18.8

47.6

0.0

39.7

CCC

Barbados

53.3

26.1

37.5

45.2

0.0

39.4

CCC

Nepal

35.2

41.7

50.0

59.5

0.0

38.7

CCC

Jordan

48.1

42.8

31.3

38.1

0.0

38.6

CCC

Malaysia

40.0

53.9

56.3

38.1

0.0

38.4

CCC

Lesotho

35.9

37.2

56.3

42.9

0.0

38.3

CCC

Taiwan

46.9

38.7

25.0

42.9

8.3

38.2

CCC

Benin

30.6

31.7

56.3

52.4

0.0

37.7

CCC

Cambodia

40.4

46.7

43.8

33.3

0.0

37.6

CCC

El Salvador

31.7

39.4

43.8

64.3

0.0

37.4

CCC

Sri Lanka

26.7

42.8

25.0

78.6

0.0

37.4

CCC

Honduras

27.6

25.6

62.5

54.8

0.0

37.0

CCC

Japan

43.5

44.4

37.5

45.2

0.0

36.6

CCC

Morocco

6.5

56.7

31.3

71.4

0.0

36.5

CCC

Kenya

35.7

38.9

37.5

59.5

0.0

36.5

CCC

Algeria

29.4

47.2

37.5

45.2

0.0

36.3

CCC

Ethiopia

27.8

51.1

56.3

47.6

0.0

36.3

CCC

Burkina Faso

38.1

30.0

43.8

42.9

0.0

35.7

CCC

Qatar

53.0

31.7

31.3

42.9

0.0

35.4

CCC

Djibouti

30.4

42.8

31.3

47.6

0.0

35.3

CCC

Mauritius

43.7

38.9

0.0

50.0

0.0

34.9

CCC

Lao People's Democratic Republic

38.9

36.7

50.0

40.5

0.0

34.0

CCC

Gambia

25.0

48.3

37.5

40.5

0.0

33.9

CCC

Rwanda

36.9

41.7

43.8

54.8

0.0

33.6

CCC

Namibia

34.1

27.8

18.8

54.8

0.0

33.3

CCC

Botswana

32.2

45.6

37.5

45.2

0.0

33.2

CCC

Tajikistan

38.9

36.1

43.8

40.5

0.0

33.0

CCC

Kazakhstan

42.8

50.0

37.5

26.2

0.0

32.8

CCC

Singapore

40.0

22.2

31.3

42.9

0.0

32.8

CCC

Tanzania, United Republic of

37.2

41.7

25.0

47.6

0.0

32.8

CCC

Bahrain

55.2

37.2

18.8

31.0

0.0

32.6

CCC

Myanmar

58.0

18.3

43.8

42.9

0.0

32.4

CCC

Oman

32.4

22.8

12.5

59.5

0.0

32.0

CCC

Madagascar

38.7

52.8

18.8

50.0

0.0

31.8

CCC

Zambia

33.3

34.4

25.0

40.5

0.0

31.8

CCC

Liberia

28.0

26.7

31.3

50.0

0.0

31.7

CCC

Guyana

33.1

44.4

25.0

45.2

0.0

31.5

CCC

Lebanon

33.9

30.0

31.3

38.1

0.0

31.3

CCC

Mali

38.9

35.6

50.0

28.6

0.0

30.8

CCC

Mongolia

27.8

33.3

31.3

54.8

0.0

30.7

CCC

Uzbekistan

30.2

33.9

31.3

64.3

0.0

30.4

CC

Angola

31.5

13.9

43.8

54.8

0.0

29.5

CC

Swaziland

36.3

18.3

37.5

47.6

0.0

29.3

CC

Timor-Leste

33.1

16.7

25.0

42.9

0.0

28.5

CC

Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of

23.3

43.9

12.5

52.4

0.0

28.2

CC

Saudi Arabia

32.4

42.8

37.5

26.2

0.0

27.9

CC

Kuwait

28.7

33.9

25.0

45.2

0.0

27.8

CC

Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

35.9

27.8

12.5

33.3

0.0

27.6

CC

Ghana

24.8

33.3

37.5

40.5

8.3

27.6

CC

China

23.5

29.4

43.8

52.4

18.3

27.4

CC

Suriname

24.3

5.6

31.3

54.8

0.0

27.1

CC

Turkmenistan

17.8

40.0

31.3

61.9

0.0

27.1

CC

Malawi

33.1

23.9

43.8

33.3

0.0

26.8

CC

Niger

29.1

35.6

25.0

35.7

0.0

25.9

CC

Cameroon

26.7

24.4

18.8

50.0

0.0

25.4

CC

Gabon

27.8

11.7

31.3

33.3

0.0

24.2

CC

Togo

28.7

21.1

31.3

21.4

0.0

23.6

CC

Cape Verde

23.5

16.1

25.0

33.3

0.0

22.9

CC

Hong Kong

30.2

10.0

12.5

31.0

0.0

21.4

CC

Cuba

13.0

15.0

18.8

42.9

0.0

20.8

CC

Russia

17.0

32.2

37.5

40.5

0.0

20.7

CC

Brunei Darussalam

17.8

19.4

0.0

42.9

0.0

20.6

C

Guinea

8.7

10.6

37.5

50.0

0.0

19.3

C

Zimbabwe

11.7

17.2

43.8

35.7

0.0

19.0

C

Papua New Guinea

26.5

30.6

6.3

26.2

0.0

18.9

C

Congo, Democratic Republic of the

25.9

24.4

37.5

14.3

0.0

18.9

C

Guinea-Bissau

7.4

31.1

31.3

21.4

0.0

18.9

C

Pakistan

21.5

15.6

12.5

40.5

0.0

18.6

C

Chad

16.7

13.9

12.5

40.5

0.0

16.7

C

Somalia

8.1

20.6

25.0

35.7

0.0

16.0

C

Mauritania

6.5

25.0

18.8

35.7

0.0

15.5

C

Sudan

2.8

26.7

25.0

33.3

0.0

14.9

C

Congo

8.3

6.7

25.0

42.9

0.0

14.8

C

Burundi

22.2

11.1

12.5

26.2

0.0

10.7

D

Equatorial Guinea

3.7

12.2

12.5

26.2

0.0

8.6

D

Iran, Islamic Republic of

7.4

9.4

0.0

23.8

0.0

6.8

D

Central African Republic

-3.7

0.6

12.5

21.4

0.0

2.5

D

Eritrea

0.0

-1.1

0.0

21.4

0.0

-2.0

D

Libya

0.0

21.7

0.0

0.0

0.0

-2.5

D

Korea, Democratic People's Republic of (North Korea)

0.0

-6.7

12.5

4.8

0.0

-5.6

Table 9Conceptual framework for measuring government responses
Milestone 1: Survivors of slavery are identified and supported to exit and remain out of modern slavery
OutcomeActivityIndicator 2018Rating description
Increase (and eventual decrease) in reported cases of modern slavery1.1 The public knows what modern slavery is and how to report it1.1.1 National campaigns provide information on how to report and identify victims to members of the general publicCampaigns on how to identify OR report potential victims, such as promotion of a hotline, website or text messaging details or distributing indicators of modern slavery
AND must be distributed to the general public at the NATIONAL level.
NOT training for government officials, NGOs, Embassy staff, health and social workers AND occurred once since 30th June 2012.
NOT general awareness campaigns which do not mention hotline or indicators of trafficking.
NOT Information is distributed to at risk or specific populations or geographic locations, such as migrant workers or at-risk communities. This is covered under milestone 4, 1.2.1
1.1.2 These campaigns are distributed systematically and at regular intervals (as distinct from one-off, isolated)If yes to 1.1.1, information has been distributed annually since 30th June 2012
OR information is promoted regularly through social media
AND there is evidence this online promotion has been regularly updated (at least once since 1st February 2016- please refer to date of Facebook posts, or date of tweets etc).
If no to 1.1.1, indicator not met.
1.1.3 There has been an increase in number of members of the public reporting cases of modern slaveryIf yes to 1.1.1, there has been an increase in public reports of modern slavery cases in recent years
AND this increase in reports is related to the campaign
OR has occurred since the campaign has been distributed to the general public
AND this must have occurred since 30th June 2012.
If no to 1.1.1, indicator not met.

2.1 Comprehensive reporting mechanisms operate effectively2.1.1 A reporting mechanism exists, such as a hotlineReporting mechanism exists where modern slavery crimes can be reported (either in isolation or as part of a larger phone service)
This includes text messaging, an online form or phone hotline
AND This reporting mechanism must be operational between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
If multiple hotlines exist covering different populations, please rate as indicator met.
2.1.2 Reporting mechanism is available for men, women and childrenIf yes to 2.1.1, this reporting mechanism is available for men, women and children to report cases of modern slavery
OR there are separate hotlines that cover men, women and children
NOT a single hotline exists where women or children can report, but nowhere for men to report exploitation.
Please refer to the most relevant reporting mechanism identified in 2.1.1 for indicators 2.1.2 through to 2.1.5.
Modern slavery/ trafficking hotline would be most relevant, followed by those which cover sub-populations (e.g. for women and/or children).
If multiple hotlines exist covering all populations, please rate as indicator met. If some populations are not covered, please rate as indicator not met
2.1.3 Reporting mechanism is free to accessIf yes to 2.1.1, this reporting mechanism is free to access.
If no to 2.1.1, indicator not met.
Please refer to the most relevant reporting mechanism identified in 2.1.1 for indicators 2.1.2 through to 2.1.5.
Modern slavery/ trafficking hotline would be most relevant, followed by those which cover sub trafficking populations (e.g. for women and/or children).
If multiple hotlines exist covering different populations and all are free, please rate as indicator met. If some of the available and relevant hotlines are not free, please rate as indicator not met
2.1.4 Reporting mechanism operates 24/7If yes to 2.1.1, this reporting mechanism operates 24/7.
If no to 2.1.1, indicator not met.
Please refer to the most relevant reporting mechanism identified in 2.1.1 for indicators 2.1.2 through to 2.1.5.
Modern slavery/ trafficking hotline would be most relevant, followed by those which cover sub trafficking populations (e.g. for women and/or children).
If multiple hotlines exist covering different populations and all are available 24/7, please rate as indicator met. If some hotlines are not available 24/7, please rate as indicator not met
2.1.5 The reporting mechanism operates in multiple languages or has capacity to provide immediate access to bring in translatorsIf yes to 2.1.1, this reporting mechanism operates in multiple languages, or brings in translators as necessary.
If no to 2.1.1, indicator not met.
Please refer to the most relevant reporting mechanism identified in 2.1.1 for indicators 2.1.2 through to 2.1.5.
Modern slavery/ trafficking hotline would be most relevant, followed by those which cover sub trafficking populations (e.g. for women and/or children).
If multiple hotlines exist covering different populations and all are available in multiple languages, please rate as indicator met. If some hotlines are not available in multiple languages, please rate as indicator not met.
Multiple languages mean national language + at least one other language.

2.2 Front line police know what modern slavery is and how to identify victims2.2.1 Training on basic legal frameworks and victim identification has been carried out for front line 'general duties' policeTraining for front line police has taken place on basic legal frameworks surrounding modern slavery AND victim identification
AND training for police has occurred once since 30th June 2012.
Definition of training includes formal in person training, as part of broader curriculum on human rights or other training programs, or part of an online training program.
Training can be provided by INGOs with government support (support defined as permission, development of the training, or monetary or in kind support).
NOT training manuals have been developed by INGOs, NGOs.NOT booklets with indicators of trafficking have been handed out to police.
NOT training for immigration, border guards, or labour inspectors.
NEGATIVE 2.2.4 There is evidence that police officers have not identified victims of modern slaveryIf yes to 2.2.1, but police officers have not identified any victims of modern slavery between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
If no to 2.2.1, indicator not met.
This indicator is specifically asking if police who have received training have identified victims. Mark as 'indicator met' where there has been a failure to identify victims post-training for police. If evidence suggests that victims have not been identified, but no training has occurred, please mark as 'indicator not met'. If the body identifying victims is not specified as 'police', government can be used as a proxy.

2.3 First responders know what modern slavery is and how to identify victims2.3.1 Training on how to identify victims of modern slavery is provided to front line regulatory bodies likely to be 'first responders'Training covers indicators of modern slavery and how to refer individuals
AND training is formal face to face or online modules
AND training is provided to one or more of the following: for border guards, immigration officials, labour inspectors
AND training has been provided once since 30th June 2012.
Training can be provided by INGOs with government support (support defined as permission, development of the training, or monetary or in kind support).
NOT leaflets have been distributed to labour inspectors or posters have been put up in airports on how to identify/ report victims.
2.3.2 Training on how to identify victims of modern slavery is provided to non-regulatory workers likely to be 'first responders'Training covers indicators of modern slavery and how to refer individuals
AND training is formal face to face or online modules
AND training is provided to one or more of the following: for teachers, doctors, nurses, social workers, tourism sector (including private tourism operators)
AND training has been provided once since 30th June 2012.Training can be provided by INGOs with government support (support defined as permission, development of the training, or monetary or in kind support).
NOT leaflets have been distributed to tour guides or posters put up in doctors surgeries on how to identify/ report victims.
2.3.3 Training for first responders is delivered systematically and at regular intervals (as distinct from one-off, isolated)If yes to 2.3.1 OR 2.3.2, training is delivered at least every two years to at least one of the above groups (labour inspectors, border guards, immigration, doctors, nurses, teachers, social workers) since 30th June 2012
AND training has been delivered to a significant proportion of these groups.
OR yes to 2.3.1 AND 2.3.2 and training is delivered at least every two years to BOTH of these groups.
NOT training has been delivered to each of these groups once since 2012
If no to 2.3.1 AND 2.3.2, then indicator not met.
Victims are provided with support to help break the cycle of vulnerability3.1 Victim determined emergency support is available for all identified victims3.1.1 Victim support services are available for some suspected victims of modern slavery (men, women and children where relevant)Any kind of victim support service is available for men, women, or children
AND services must be government run, or funded by government, or provided with in-kind support from the government
AND services must be operational between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
NOT INGOs run a shelter without any government support. (Support defined as permission, development of the training, or monetary or in-kind support).
3.1.2 NEGATIVE Suspected victims are held in shelters against their will and do not have a choice about whether or not to remain in a shelterIf yes to 3.1.1, adult victims are unable to leave a shelter or safe house when they wish (or are unable to leave without a chaperone). Children must also be able to leave when they wish but should be accompanied with a chaperone. If evidence that victims (adults and children) are detained against their will or are unable to leave unaccompanied (adults) or with a chaperone (children), this meets the criteria of the indicator. If no to 3.1.1, not met this indicator.
3.1.3 Government contributes to the operational costs of the shelters and there are no significant resource gapsIf yes to 3.1.1, government provides support to the shelters. Support defined as in kind or monetary support (not just permission).
NOT INGO funds and runs a shelter or safe house.
If no to 3.1.1, not met indicator.
If government provides some resources, but there are significant gaps not covered by INGOs or government, then please rate as indicator not met
3.1.4 Physical and mental health services are provided to victims of modern slaveryIf yes to 3.1.1, there is evidence of some physical AND mental health support for victims of modern slavery since 30th June 2012.
If no to 3.1.1., not met indicator.
If government provides some physical and mental health support, but there are significant gaps not covered by INGOs or government, then please rate as indicator not met.
3.1.5 NEGATIVE Victim support services are not available for all victims of modern slaveryIf yes to 3.1.1 AND there have been identified modern slavery cases of men, women, children, (or other relevant groups-foreign victims, forced labour victims, victims of commercial sexual exploitation etc), AND there are NO specific shelters or services for them.
This has also occurred between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017. NOT services are not available for a particular group, but no cases within that group were identified.
This indicator is measuring gaps in existing services.
3.1.7 NEGATIVE No victims have accessed the services or sheltersIf yes to 3.1.1, despite availability of services, victims have not accessed them
AND this has occurred between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017. Examples include cases where facilities exist, but victims are not being transferred to these facilities.
This indicator is measuring the use of existing services.

3.2 Victim determined longer-term support is available for all identified victims3.2.1 Services provide long term reintegration supportIf yes to 3.1.1, long term reintegration is defined as evidence of financial support, provision of housing, job training and/or placement, or receipt of social welfare, or provision of education for victims of modern slavery
AND there is evidence that this has been provided between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
If no to 3.1.1, indicator not met.
NOT visas are available for victims- this is covered under M1 3.2.2.
3.2.2 Measures are in place to address the migration situation of victims who want to remain or be resettledVisas are available so that foreign victims can receive support either in country or in a third country after a reflection period has expired.
AND These are available between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
Note: not dependent on 3.1.1.
These visas include cover longer term visas AND reflection periods) awarded on the basis of personal situation OR participation in court case.
3.2.3 Services are child friendlyIf yes to 3.1.1, children have specialised services, separate shelters, or given some kind of special support (NOT including support in the criminal justice system)
AND this has occurred since 30th June 2012.
If no to 3.1.1, indicator not met.
NOT children are placed in correctional facilities, boarding schools or other non-specialised institutions


3.2.4 Victims are assisted to make contact with their family or contact person of choiceIf yes to 3.1.1, victims are assisted to make contact with families by the government
OR there is a family reunification program
AND this is operating between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
NOT Programs or family reunification program exists but is not currently funded.
NOT INGOs operate a family reunification program, without government support.
If no to 3.1.1, not met this indicator.

3.3 Services have been evaluated3.3.1 Training has been carried out for all staff providing direct assistance servicesIf yes to 3.1.1, evidence of any training for those who provide direct victim support services.
This training includes how to assist victims of modern slavery, and can include do no harm principles, individualised treatment and care, comprehensive care, self-determination and participation, non-discrimination, confidentiality and right to privacy
OR Direct assistance is provided by fully qualified social workers, psychologists or doctors
AND This has occurred since 30th June 2012.
Training can be provided by INGOs with government support (support defined as permission, development of the training, or monetary or in kind support).
NOT Training is provided by unskilled volunteers.
If no to 3.1.1, not met this indicator.
NOT General modern slavery training is provided to social workers.
Direct assistance services means those services provided to workers who have regular contact with victims post-identification. It can include shelter workers, case managers, doctors and psychologists.
3.3.2 Direct victim assistance services have been evaluatedIf yes to 3.1.1, evidence of formal reporting or evaluation of direct victim support services has been undertaken
AND this has occurred once since 30th June 2012.
Evaluation (internal or external) is defined as an assessment of the current services against the service objectives and incorporating client feedback.
NOT a description of the program or services provided NOT ad hoc inspections without a clear sense of follow up activities.
NOT evaluations of the national action plan- this is covered under M3 2.1.1.
3.3.3 Evaluations of services have been provided to the National Referral Mechanism or coordinating referral bodyIf yes to 3.3.2, a report of these evaluations has been made to the National Referral Mechanism or coordinating referral body to inform future assistance programming
AND this has occurred once since 30th June 2012.
Government coordinates the identification and referral of victims4.1 Identification guidelines are used by all first responders4.1.1 The government has clear national guidelines for identifying and screening victims for all first respondersNational general guidelines exist for identification AND screening of victims
AND have been distributed to all first responders
AND this has occurred since 30th June 2012.
First responders are defined as: immigration, border patrol, labour inspectors, NGOs, teachers, social workers, doctors, nurses, and the tourism industry.
General guidelines should exist at the national level for all responders, NOT police have their own guidelines
4.1.2 The guidelines make provision for a category of 'presumed victims', who can be provided with services until a formal determination is made.If yes to 4.1.1, guidelines include provisions so victims who have not yet been assessed to be victims of modern slavery can still receive services.
If no to 4.1.1, indicator not met.
Examples include, 'presumed' categories within guidelines, or 'informal' assistance given to victims while determination is made.
4.1.3 The guidelines clearly set out which organisations have the authority to identify victims of modern slaveryIf yes to 4.1.1, guidelines outline which organisations can or cannot formally identify victims of modern slavery.
If no to 4.1.1, indicator not met.
Examples include a list of approved agencies and NGOs who can identify and certify victims of modern slavery.
4.2 National Referral Mechanism is operating effectively4.2.1 A 'National Referral Mechanism' brings together government and civil society to ensure victims are being referred to servicesThere is a national referral mechanism for victims of modern slavery
AND includes government and non- government organisations
AND operating during the period 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017
A national referral mechanism is a group of approved NGOs and government agencies which refers victims to services.
NOT evidence that victims have been referred without a national system in place
4.2.2 There is evidence that victims are being referred to services using the National Referral MechanismThere is evidence that victims are referred through the national referral mechanism
AND this has happened once between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017
Milestone 2: Criminal justice mechanisms function effectively to prevent modern slavery
OutcomeActivityIndicator 2018Rating description
Legislation deters citizens from committing crime of modern slavery1.1 Relevant international conventions are ratified1.1.1 Slavery Convention, 1926Ratification, or succession (d) or accession (a) of 1926 Slavery Convention.
NOT signed the 1926 Slavery Convention, WITHOUT accession, succession or ratification.
1.1.2 Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery, 1956Ratification, succession (d) or accession (a) of the 1956 Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery.
NOT signed the Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery 1956, WITHOUT accession, ratification, or succession.
1.1.3 Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, 2000Ratification, Acceptance (A), Accession (a), or Succession (d) of the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, 2000.
NOT signed the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime 2000, WITHOUT Ratification, Acceptance (A), accession (a), or Succession (d).
1.1.4 Abolition of Forced Labour Convention ILO, No. 105, 1957Status must be 'In Force' for the Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, No. 105, 1957
AND 'In Force' as of 30th June 2017.
NOT 'In force' for the Forced Labour Convention (1930).
1.1.5 Domestic Workers Convention ILO No. 189, 2011Status must be 'In Force' for the Domestic Workers Convention, No, 189
AND 'In Force' as of 30th June 2017.
1.1.6 Worst Forms of Child Labour ILO 182, 1999Status must be 'In Force' for the Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (ILO 182)
AND 'In Force' as of 30th June 2017.
1.1.7 Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict, 2000Ratification, succession (d) or accession (a) of the CRC Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 2000.
NOT signed the CRC Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict 2000, WITHOUT accession, ratification, or succession.
1.1.8 Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, 2000Ratification, succession (d) or accession (a) of the CRC Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography 2000.
NOT signed the CRC Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography 2000, WITHOUT accession, ratification, or succession.
1.1.9 International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families, 1990Ratification, succession (d) or accession (a) of the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families 1990.
NOT signed or signed to succeed the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families 1990, WITHOUT accession, ratification, or succession.
1.1.10 Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029, 1930Status must be 'In Force' for the Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, P029, 1930 AND 'In Force' as of 30th June 2017

1.2 Domestic legislation is in line with international conventions1.2.1 Human trafficking is criminalisedHuman Trafficking is listed as a standalone article in the Penal Code or Criminal Code
OR Human Trafficking is criminalised under a distinct piece of legislation
AND Within either the penal code or distinct legislation human trafficking does not require movement of individuals across international borders
AND The legislation covers men, women and children.
Movement may include cross-border/transnational movement, or internal movement such as movement from a rural to urban location.
Definition of trafficking includes action, means, and purpose.
Trafficking in persons shall require action (e.g. recruitment, transportation, transfer, or harbouring), means (e.g. by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud), and purpose (eg. exploitation).
1.2.2 Slavery is criminalisedSlavery is criminalised as a distinct crime.
The offence of slavery must include a situation in which the status or condition of a person over whom any or all of the powers attaching to the right of ownership are exercised. Slavery may be listed as a standalone crime in the Penal or Criminal Code or in trafficking specific legislation or in another act
NOT Slavery is prohibited in the Constitution
1.2.3 Forced labour is criminalisedForced labour is criminalised as a distinct crime.
Forced or compulsory labour means all work or service which is exacted from any person under the menace of any penalty and for which the said person has not offered himself voluntarily. Does not include compulsory military service, work which forms part of the normal civic obligations of the citizen, or work performed in cases of emergency (such as war, fire, famine or flood).
The offence of forced labour must include
(1) work performed under the menace of any penalty;
(2) work for which the said person has not offered himself voluntarily.
These two components must be present in order for the indicator to have been met.
Forced labour may be listed as a standalone crime in the Penal or Criminal Code or in trafficking specific legislation or in another act.
1.2.4 Use of children in armed conflict is criminalisedCriminal code or standalone legislation specifically criminalises use of children in armed conflict.
NOT where the age of recruitment is 18, but there is no criminalisation of the use of children in armed forces.
Must cover use of children in state (national army) and armed groups (non-state armed groups).
1.2.5 Child prostitution is criminalisedThe penal or criminal code or trafficking legislation includes provisions that it is an offence:
to sell/force a child into prostitution,
AND to buy sexual acts with a child.
NOT met when selling a child is criminalised AND child sex abuse is criminalised (second component must criminalise purchase of sex with a child).
1.2.6 Forced marriage is criminalisedForced marriage is criminalised as a distinct crime, in the penal or criminal code, trafficking legislation or other act
NOT The legal age of marriage is set at 18.
If kidnapping is required to be present for the crime of forced marriage to occur, this is indicator not met.
1.2.7 NEGATIVE Criminal laws have disproportionate penaltiesPenalties as laid out in legislation are cruel or inhumane
OR are not sufficient enough to deter future offenders.
This does NOT refer to judicial sentences, rather the punishments outlined in legislation.
Cruel and inhumane punishments include torture, deliberately degrading punishment, or punishment that is too severe- capital punishment, whipping, or other forms of physical violence. Insufficient punishments would include fines for modern slavery related crimes.
Victims are able to access justice1.4 National laws recognise that victims are able to participate in court process to receive justice1.4.1 National laws allow victims to participate in the legal system, regardless of their role as a witnessNational laws allow victims to participate in the legal system regardless of their role as a witness.
This includes: allowing victims to give evidence (without being called as a witness),
OR providing information on the court processes in languages victims understand,
OR allowing victims to inspect and add documents to the file,
OR and the admission of victim impact statements.
NOT there is evidence or a general statement that victims participate in the criminal justice process as witnesses.
Relevant national laws include Criminal Procedure Code, or Criminal law (sentencing) Acts.
1.4.2 Law recognizes that victims should not be treated as criminals for conduct that occurred while under control of criminalsNational laws recognise victims are not a criminal for conduct during enslavement
AND This must refer to modern slavery crimes, not general provisions in legislation.
Modern slavery crimes are defined as human trafficking, forced labour, slavery, forced marriage, and children in armed conflict.
NOT there is no evidence that victims have been criminalised
1.4.3 Visas to stay in the country are not dependent on victim participation in the court processVisas to remain are not tied to participation in the court process. For example, visas are awarded to trafficking victims on the basis of humanitarian or personal reasons, not because they've agreed to participate in the court process.
1.4.5 NEGATIVE There is evidence that victims of modern slavery have been treated as criminals for conduct that occurred while under control of criminalsVictims have been arrested for crimes committed while under the control of the person exploiting them
AND This has occurred between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
NOT Foreign nationals have been deported OR detained for immigration offences (no visa, overstaying visa etc). This is covered under milestone 3, 3.2.2.
Examples would be victims have been arrested on prostitution charges or arrested for drug production. If victims are arrested and released as soon as it is realised that they are victims, please rate as indicator not met.

2.1 Services exist to allow victims to access justice2.1.1 Free legal services for victims of modern slavery are made explicit in legislationAny kind of free legal services or advice exists in legislation, including free legal advice, and free legal representation
AND these are either specific to victims of modern slavery
OR victims of modern slavery can access broader legal advice, which is available for all victims of crime.
NOT Legal services are available, but not free.
NOT Free legal services are only available for citizens, not foreign victims.
NOT Free legal services are available for certain types of crime (such as violent crime) and modern slavery is not specified.
NOT Free legal services are offered by NGOs, but not made explicit in legislation.
If free legal services exist in legislation AND there is no evidence they are not being used, please rate as indicator met.
If free legal services exist in practice, but there is no evidence of their existence in legislation, please rate as indicator met.
If free legal services are NOT in legislation and no evidence of these being used, please rate as indicator not met.
If free legal services exist in legislation and there is evidence they are not used or are poorly implemented, please rate as indicator not met.
2.1.3 Witness and victim protection mechanisms are explicit in legislation to ensure that neither witnesses nor victims are intimidated, nor interfered with INSIDE the courtGovernment operated or supported witness and victim protection mechanisms exist in legislation so that victims are not intimidated or interfered with INSIDE the court.
Government operated or supported is defined as government run, or funded by government, or provided with in-kind support from the government.
NOT applicable outside the court room, see M2, indicator 2.1.4.
Victim protection mechanisms inside the courtroom refers to provision of video testimony, victims are not cross- examined, and victims are protected from perpetrators.
If witness protection mechanisms exist in legislation AND there is no evidence they are not being used, please rate as indicator met.
If witness protection mechanisms exist in practice, but there is no evidence of their existence in legislation, please rate as indicator met.
If witness protection mechanisms are NOT in legislation and no evidence of these being used, please rate as indicator not met.
If witness protection mechanisms exist in legislation and there is evidence they are not used or are poorly implemented, please rate as indicator not met.
2.1.4 Witness and victim protection mechanisms are explicit in legislation to ensure that neither witnesses nor victims are intimidated, nor interfered with OUTSIDE the courtGovernment operated or supported witness and victim protection mechanisms exist in legislation so that victims are not intimidated or interfered with OUTSIDE the court.
Government operated or supported is defined as government run, or funded by government, or provided with in-kind support from the government.
NOT applicable inside the court room, see milestone 2, indicator 2.1.3.
Witness and victim protection mechanisms include an official witness protection program where individuals are provided with security, new identities, and relocation support, or protection where the victim's identity is not revealed to the public.
If witness protection mechanisms exist in legislation AND there is no evidence they are not being used, please rate as indicator met.
If witness protection mechanisms exist in practice, but there is no evidence of their existence in legislation, please rate as indicator met.
If witness protection mechanisms are NOT in legislation and no evidence of these being used, please rate as indicator not met.
If witness protection mechanisms exist in legislation and there is evidence they are not used or are poorly implemented, please rate as indicator not met.
2.1.5 The legal framework supports restitution or compensation for victims of modern slaveryThe legal framework allows victims of modern slavery to receive compensation for damages incurred as a result of exploitation
OR the legal framework allows victims of modern slavery to receive restitution for damages incurred as a result of exploitation.
Compensation is when a court orders the defendant (perpetrator) to pay the claimant (victim) for his/her loss.
Restitution is when a court orders the defendant (perpetrator) to give up his/her gains to the claimant (victim).
When the compensation and/ or restitution is available only for victims of violent crimes, please mark as indicator not met- this may exclude some victims of modern slavery who are not subject to violent crimes.
If compensation and/ or restitution exists in legislation AND there is no evidence they are not being used, please rate as indicator met.
If compensation and/or restitution exists in practice, but there is no evidence of their existence in legislation, please rate as indicator met.
If compensation and/or restitutios is NOT in legislation and no evidence of these being used, please rate as indicator not met.
If compensation and/or restitution exists in legislation and there is evidence they are not used or are poorly implemented, please rate as indicator not met.
2.1.6 Child friendly services are provided for in legislationLegislation specifies that children require special services during the court case.
NOT there is any evidence of child friendly services being used in court.
Child friendly services include the use of screens or video testimonies, training of judges in child friendly questioning, and the use of one support person or guardian during the court process.
If child friendly services exist in legislation AND there is no evidence they are not being used, please rate as indicator met.
If child friendly services exist in practice, but there is no evidence of their existence in legislation, please rate as indicator met.
If child friendly services are NOT in legislation and no evidence of these being used, please rate as indicator not met.
If child friendly services exist in legislation and there is evidence they are not used or are poorly implemented, please rate as indicator not met.

3.1 Specialised police units are able to investigate modern slavery crimes
 
3.1.1 Specialised law enforcement units existHas to be a specialised law enforcement unit or a sub-unit or team within the law enforcement structure that has specialised mandate to conduct investigations into modern slavery,
OR provide specialist support for colleagues
AND this unit is operating since 30th June 2012.
NOT Local level anti trafficking coordination bodies.
3.1.3 NEGATIVE Units do not have necessary resources to be able to operate effectivelyIf yes to 3.1.1, these units, sub-units, or teams do not have sufficient budget, or operational equipment, or are understaffed. This has an impact on their ability to function. This lack of resources must have occurred between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
3.1.4 Units have Standard Operating Procedures for modern slavery casesIf yes to 3.1.1, the unit or team has standard operating procedures for modern slavery cases
AND must be specific to specialist units.
NOT SOPs/ guidelines have been produced by an INGO in the last 5 years (since 30th June 2012) with no evidence of use by specialist unit.
SOPs include, for example: clear standardised procedures for use across the unit, including how to liaise with front line officers, on how to conduct risk assessments, interview techniques (covering witnesses, child victims and use of interpreters), definitions and indicators of modern slavery, victim centred approaches (understanding of psychological stress and its impact on investigations), case referrals etc.
SOPs are NOT an internal memo recommending that police focus on modern slavery cases.
SOPs are NOT a booklet handed out to police with indicators of modern slavery.

3.2 Increased number of quality prosecutions3.2.1 Training is provided to the judiciaryTraining for the judiciary has taken place on human trafficking and related legislation, victim needs in the court room, basic international legal standards in modern slavery cases, trends in modern slavery in the country, and victim profiles
AND training for judiciary has occurred once since 30th June 2012.
Definition of training includes formal in person training, as part of broader curriculum on human rights or other training programs, or part of an online training program.
Training can be provided by INGOs with government support (support defined as permission, development of the training, or monetary or in kind support).
NOT training manuals have been developed by INGOs, NGOs.
NOT booklets with description of modern slavery laws have been handed out to judiciary.
3.2.2 Training is provided to prosecutorsTraining for prosecutors has taken place on human trafficking and related legislation, victim needs in the court room, basic international legal standards in modern slavery cases, trends in modern slavery in the country, and victim profiles
AND training for prosecutors has occurred once since 30th June 2012.
Definition of training includes formal in person training, as part of broader curriculum on human rights or other training programs, or part of an online training program.
Training can be provided by INGOs with government support (support defined as permission, development of the training, or monetary or in kind support).
NOT training manuals have been developed by INGOs, NGOs.
NOT booklets with description of modern slavery laws have been handed out to prosecutors.


3.2.4 Training is systematic and recurrent (as distinct from one-off, isolated)If yes to 3.2.1, 3.2.2, OR 3.2.2, training is has occurred at least once to at least one of the above groups (judiciary or prosecutors) since 30th June 2012
AND training has been delivered to a significant proportion of these groups
OR yes to 3.2.1, 3.2.2, OR 3.2.3 and training has been delivered at least once to BOTH groups (judges, prosecutors) since 30th June 2012.
NOT training has been delivered to each of these groups once since 2012.
If no to 3.2.1, AND 3.2.2, then indicator not met.
3.2.5 NEGATIVE Judicial punishments are NOT proportionate to severity of the crime and culpability of the offender.Judicial punishments are either too lenient or too harsh for offenders
AND this has occurred during the period 1st February 2016 to 30th June 2017. Examples of too lenient include giving of fines, suspended sentences, and sentences are less than the prescribed minimum. Examples of too harsh are corporal punishment and capital punishment.
Milestone 3: Coordination occurs at the national and regional level, and governments are held to account for their response
OutcomeActivityIndicators 2018Rating description
Responses to modern slavery are coordinated1.1 National mechanisms exist to coordinate the response1.1.1 National coordination body exists involving both government and NGOsNational coordination body on modern slavery (trafficking, slavery, forced labour, children in armed conflict) exists that includes both NGOs and government representatives
AND this group met at least once between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
This body coordinates the whole of the government response to modern slavery. NOT a National Action Plan.
NOT a group or body that refers victims. This is covered under Milestone 1, 4.2.1.
1.2.1 National Action Plan exists with clear indicators and allocation of responsibilitiesAny National Action Plan (NAP) on modern slavery, or that covers any component of modern slavery, such as trafficking, forced marriage, forced marriage, children in armed conflict
AND this NAP covers part or all of the period 1st February 2016 to 30th June 2017.
NOT Child labour NAPs, or broader human rights NAPs, women empowerment NAPs, unless they include a specific modern slavery section.
NOT Regional action plans, such as the Regional Action Plan to End Child Marriage in South Asia (developed with SAARC countries).
1.3.2 Government routinely uses the National Action Plan as a framework for reporting its actionsIf yes to 1.2.1, the government releases annual reports against the national action plan, including process reviews of major anti-slavery initiatives, budgets/expenditure and implementation plans for the following year/s.
If no to 1.2.1, then this indicator cannot be met.
1.3.5 Activities in the national action plan are fully fundedIf yes to 1.2.1, there is evidence that there is a budget attached to the NAP and this is fully funded.
Still indicator met if the NAP is part funded by government and part funded by IOs or NGOs, but that all activities are funded.
NOT The activities are costed, but it is unclear where this money is coming from OR there are reports of significant gaps in funding which is not plugged by IOs, NGOs or other agencies.
If no to 1.2.1, then this indicator cannot be met.

2.1 Independent mechanisms exist to monitor the response2.1.1 Independent entity to monitor the implementation and effectiveness of National Action Plan existsAn independent entity is established to monitor the activities of the government in relation to their anti-modern slavery efforts.
This body can be outside the NAP and does not have to only focus solely on modern slavery.
Independent entity can be an independent statutory body or individual or other third party, that DOES NOT implement the government response to modern slavery. Examples would include a Human Rights Commission or National Rapporteur.
NOT regional entities that inspect government responses, such as GRETA in Europe

3.1 General cross border collaboration exists3.1.1 The government is involved in a regional responseThe government is part of a regional response.
A relevant regional body includes:  
  • A body with more than two country representatives as members of the group; and
  • A focus on some form of modern slavery.
The government must have signed onto, or have agreed to abide by the shared values, and objectives developed by the group (i.e. a code of conduct, an MoU on proposed outcomes etc.)
3.1.3 Agreements exist between the government and countries of origin and/ or destination to collaborate on modern slavery issuesAgreements exist between governments of countries of origin and/ or destination on modern slavery issues to collaborate on modern slavery issues
NOT labour migration agreements- covered under M3 3.2.6 NOT evidence of repatriation- covered under M3 3.2.1.

3.2 Cross border collaboration exists, specific to foreign victims of modern slavery3.2.1 The government cooperates with the government of the home country to facilitate repatriationThe government cooperates with home country for voluntary repatriation of foreign nationals.
This could include repatriation mediated by IOM (MUST have evidence that police or government authorities refer victims to IOM).
AND This has occurred since 30th June 2012
NOT Evidence of deportation.
Repatriation refers to the voluntary return of individuals to their home country with their consent.
Deportation refers to the removal of an individual from a country without their consent.
NEGATIVE 3.2.4 Foreign victims are detained and/ or deported for immigration violationsForeign victims are detained in detention facilities or deported for immigration violations. Can include instances where victims are detained for a breach of visa conditions OR instances foreign victims are deported to countries of origin without access to assistance.
This occurred between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
Note: if victims are arrested for crimes committed while enslaved, please refer to Milestone 2, 1.4.2
3.2.6 Agreements exist between countries on labour migration, which provide protection for labour migrantsThese agreements provide protection for labour migrants, NOT agreements regarding number of labour migrants sent/ received. For countries that are part of the EU, membership is not sufficient to offer protection. Instead, please see national legislation has been harmonised with EU requirements under EU law- See GRETA reports
Milestone 4: Risk factors, such as attitudes, social systems and institutions, that enable modern slavery are addressed
OutcomeActivityIndicators 2018Rating description
Government programming reflects and responds to known risk factors and drivers of modern slavery and patterns of exploitation1.1. Risk factors, drivers, and patterns of exploitation are understood and inform government action1.1.1 Government facilitates or funds non- prevalence research on modern slaveryGovernment funds or has been actively involved in research on any type of modern slavery, including responses to modern slavery, and the attitudes, social systems and institutions that place people at risk of modern slavery
AND this has occurred at least once since 30th June 2012.
Active involvement is defined as development of the research, participation in the research, or monetary or in kind support.
Modern slavery includes trafficking, forced labour, slavery, worst forms of child labour, forced marriage and use of child soldiers.
NOT civil society conducts research without government involvement.
NOT government conducts research on child labour.
NOT government conducts prevalence research
1.1.2 Government facilitates or funds research prevalence or estimation studies of modern slaveryThe government funds or has been actively involved in prevalence or estimation studies of modern slavery.
AND this has occurred at least once since 30th June 2012.
Active involvement is defined as development of the research, participation in the research, or monetary or in kind support.
Modern slavery includes trafficking, forced labour, slavery, worst forms of child labour, forced marriage and use of child soldiers.
The research must provide estimations of the number of people in modern slavery.
NOT civil society conducts research without government involvement.
1.1.3 Government interventions that aim to address modern slavery are evidence-based.There is evidence that government interventions or programs are based on strategies or theories of change identified by research
AND this has occurred since 30th June 2012.
Evidence can include a broader government strategy which incorporates modern slavery research, the national action plan incorporates modern slavery research or that the national action plan or strategy is reviewed in line with recent modern slavery research
1.2 Government interventions are tailored to risks1.2.1 Awareness campaigns target specific known risks of modern slaveryAny awareness campaign implemented by the government, which provides detailed information on how to avoid the risks of modern slavery
AND has run at least once since 30th June 2012.
Campaign can be implemented by the government with a partner NGO OR funded by the government and implemented by an NGO.
These campaigns can include domestic violence, forced marriage, child marriage, the worst forms of child labour, child soldiers, and risky migration practices.
NOT an awareness raising counter trafficking campaign run by an international organisation.
NOT Promotion of the hotline- this is covered under milestone 1, 1.1.1.
Vulnerable populations do not become enslaved1.3 Safety nets exist for vulnerable populations1.3.2 The government conducts labour inspections in the informal sector to identify cases of modern slaveryThe government funds labour inspections which are conducted with specific intent of finding modern slavery victims in the informal sector.
Government funding is defined as monetary or in-kind support.
Informal sector includes workers in un-regulated industries. i.e. sex work, brick kilns, agriculture, fishing, and domestic work.
AND these inspections have occurred since 30th June 2012.
NOT private companies or corporates conduct their own inspections.
NOT labour inspectors are trained on modern slavery. This is covered under M1 2.3.1
1.3.3 Affordable health care for vulnerable populations existsAffordable health care includes the presence of state health care schemes, community health schemes, or financial assistance focused on providing access to health care for vulnerable groups.
Health care is available for all and does not discriminate based on gender, ethnicity, religious background or geographic region.
NOT Health care is available for victims of modern slavery- this is covered under M1 3.1.4.
For example, health care is too costly, thereby excluding certain groups or health care is too centralised, thereby excluding certain geographical regions, please rate as indicator not met.
1.3.4 Public primary education is available for all children regardless of ethno-cultural or religious backgroundPublic primary education system exists.
Education is available for all children and does not discriminate based on gender, ethnicity, religious background or geographic region.
For example, primary education is too costly, thereby excluding attendance by certain groups of children, or education is not available to Roma groups, please rate as indicator not met.

1.4 Official complicity is illegal1.4.1 National laws criminalise corruption in the public sectorPublic corruption is criminalised in legalisation.
Public sector includes government officials, including police, immigration, and border guards. Corruption includes, at a minimum, bribery of officials. Please refer to legislation, not to instances of combating corruption.

1.4 NEGATIVE Official complicity is not investigated1.4.3 NEGATIVE Reports of individual officials' complicity in modern slavery cases have not been investigatedAny reports of individual officials' complicity or corruption in modern slavery cases between 1st February 2016 to 30th June 2017.
Individual officials include: government officials, police, immigration officials, border guards, and labour inspectors.
Excludes consular staff (covered by milestone 4, indicator 1.7.5)MUST be related to modern slavery crimes (trafficking, forced labour, slavery, forced marriage, use of child soldiers, and worst forms of child labour).
NOT Evidence of general corruption of law enforcement. 
Must refer to more than one report of complicity within the reporting period AND no steps have been taken to investigate these reports 11

1.5 Social protections exist1.5.1 Birth registration systems existThe government funds or supports birth registration systems that covers the entire population.
Can include systems which are implemented or funded by INGOs, but with government support.
Government support is defined as development of the birth registration system, participation in the system, or monetary or in kind support.
Covering the entire population refers to the % of people who are registered. Award indicator not met if less than 95% of the population is registered OR specific groups are missing. See UNICEF statistics and supplement with additional research on missing vulnerable populations. Vulnerable populations can include ethnic, cultural or religious groups who do not have equal access to birth registration. E.g. Roma populations
1.5.2 Systems are in place to allow asylum seekers to seek protectionThere are policies and procedures in place so that asylum seekers are able to access basic support and protection within a country's borders
Services may be provided by IOs/NGOs with government support
Government support is defined as development of the asylum seeker system, participation in the system, or monetary or in kind support.
NOT Asylum seekers are detained without access to services
NOT Asylum seekers are deported without their claims being assessed
NOT Asylum seekers claims are assessed outside of the country where they sought asylum

1.6 Safety nets exist for migrant workers1.6.3 Laws or policies state that private recruitment fees are paid by the employer, not the employeeGovernment legislation or policies state that recruitment fees payable to recruitment agencies are not charged to the employee (i.e. are paid by the employer, not employee). Please check Labour Code or Employment Act for this information
1.6.5 Labour laws extend to everyone, including migrant workers, domestic workers and those in the fishing and construction sectors.The legal definition of an employee includes all vulnerable workers, such as domestic workers, migrant workers, construction workers, maritime workers, etc. If the jurisdiction does not have a generic definition of an employee, or a labour code, the information can come from NGOs, related legislation or reports.
NOT Domestic workers are not explicitly mentioned in legislation.
NOT Labour protections do not cover fishermen in territorial waters.
This indicator does not extend to army, judiciary and civil service - if these are NOT included, and all other groups are included, this is still indicator met.
1.6.7 NEGATIVE Patterns of abuse of labour migrants are institutionalised, or systematic and uncheckedAbuse of migrant workers is institutionalised, or systematic and not addressed. Institutionalised means that these practices are part of government policy, or that these patterns of abuse are systematic, and the government is taking little if any action to address this.
Patterns of abuse includes multiple instances of the following: high recruitment fees, or high interest rates on fees, makes it impossible to pay these fees back, or withheld passports is a common occurrence by the majority of employers, or most workers have restrictions placed on their movement by their employers
AND this occurred between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
NOT instances of these abuses are reported, but the government is taking action against these.
1.6.9 NEGATIVE There are laws or policies that prevent or make it difficult for workers to leave abusive employers without risk of loss of visa and deportationAny current specific government policy or law that leads to loss of visa or deportation of migrant workers (or specific groups of migrant workers, such as domestic workers) for leaving abusive employers.
AND current defined as operating between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.
NOT there is evidence of victims being deported for breach of visa conditions, but this does not occur as a direct result of government policy. This is covered under milestone 3, indicator 3.2.4.

1.7 Government provides support for citizens overseas1.7.1 Government provides training for its consular staff on modern slaveryGovernments provide training for its embassy or consular staff before departure for a posting or during a posting.
AND This has occurred once since 1st February 2012.
Definition of training includes formal in person training, as part of broader curriculum on human rights or other training programs, or part of an online training program.
Training can be provided by INGOs with government support (support defined as permission, development of the training, or monetary or in kind support).
NOT training manuals have been developed by INGOs, NGOs.
NOT booklets with indicators of trafficking have been handed out to Embassy staff.
1.7.2 Government provides identification documents and support travel arrangements for citizen returnAny citizen found to be exploited overseas can obtain documents from their own country or be facilitated with travel back to their country by their own government. These documents are normally given by a citizen's Embassies or Consulates
AND this has occurred at least once since 30th June 2012.
This information can be found in modern slavery legislation, or on Ministry/Department of Foreign Affairs websites.
1.7.5 NEGATIVE Diplomatic staff are not investigated for alleged complicity in modern slavery cases or abuse of victimsDiplomatic/Embassy staff are complicit in the exploitation of nationals or abuse those who seek assistance at the Embassy and no investigations have taken place
AND this has occurred between 1st February 2016 and 30th June 2017.

1.8 NEGATIVE Government places its population, or part of its population in forced labour1.8.1 NEGATIVE State sanctioned forced labour existsAny form of state sanctioned labour, where the government forced the whole, or segments of the population, to work under threat of penalty, and for which work, the person or population has not offered himself voluntarily. Excludes compulsory military services, work which forms part of normal civil obligations of the citizen, or work performed in cases of emergency (such as war, fire, famine or flood)12
Milestone 5: Government and business stop sourcing goods and services produced by forced labour
OutcomeActivityIndicator 2018Rating description
Government sources goods and services which are slavery free and encourages businesses to practice due diligence1.1 Government regulates and investigates public procurement to prevent use of forced labour1.1.1 Guidelines exist for public procurement officialsThe government has drafted guidelines or an internal memo for public procurement officials that outline standards and/ or operating procedures to prevent use of modern slavery in the purchase of public goods or services. These guidelines can include general guidelines on human rights, which include sub sections on modern slavery.
1.1.2 Public procurement policies and systems exist to minimise the risk of governments purchasing products tainted by forced labourThe Government drafts and implements public procurement policies that outline standards for public procurement, which explicitly prohibit using businesses suspected of using forced labour or purchasing products that were made using forced labour.
These policies can include inserting clauses in public contracts prohibiting the use of forced labour, not making purchasing decisions on price alone, steps to be taken should a contractor be found to use forced labour, or requiring government contractors over a certain value to maintain compliance plans
1.1.3 Annual reports on government action to prevent use of forced labour in public procurement are produced and publicly availableThe government releases reports on activities taken to prevent use of forced labour in public procurement
AND this has to have occurred since 30th June 2012.
OR if the policy has been adopted in the last two years (since 1st February 2015), it is enough that reporting is stipulated as part of regulating compliance.
The report can also be on human rights but include a sub section on modern slavery.
1.1.4 The government has provided training to public procurement officials on modern slaveryThe government has provided training to procurement officials on what is modern slavery, how it is relevant to their role, existing government policies and their implementation.
This training is provided face to face, or through online training modules, and has occurred at least once since 30th June 2012.
1.1.5 There is evidence that the government has taken remedial action where forced labour has been discoveredThere is evidence that the government has worked with contractors to implement corrective action plans who have identified issues with the use of forced labour.
OR where the use of forced labour is prevalent and the contractor is unwilling to work with the government, there is evidence that the government has cancelled the contract.
AND this has occurred since 30th June 2012.

2.1 Government encourages business to practice due diligence2.1.1 Laws or policies require businesses to report on their actions to implement risk minimisation policiesLegislation or policies require business to report on their actions to minimise risk of forced labour in their supply chain. E.g. The UK Modern Slavery Act requires businesses earning over 36 million GBP pa to report on their actions to combat modern slavery
2.1.2 Governments have identified high risk sectors and taken action to work with these sectors to eradicate modern slaveryThe government has collaborated with businesses to identify high risk sectors and set up national sector specific initiatives that support businesses in a particular sector to tackle modern slavery. These initiatives can be broader initiatives that cover off sustainability, health and safety etc, but must include some elements of tackling modern slavery.
For example, the sustainable textile partnership in Germany
2.1.3 Laws or policies allow governments to create a public list of businesses who have been found to tolerate slavery in their supply chainsThe government has worked with business and NGOs to create a public list of businesses which have been found to tolerate forced labour in their supply chains AND/OR these businesses are prevented from accessing public funds. For example, the 'dirty list' in Brazil.
2.1.4 Governments implement a responsible investment reporting requirement for investment funds and banks head-quartered in their country to ensure that investment does not support modern slaveryInvestment funds and banks head quartered the country have to report on modern slavery risk in investments AND Reporting must occur at least every two years. If policy is in place, there MUST be evidence that this has occurred since 30th June 2012 OR If the policy has just been adopted, it is enough that reporting is stipulated as part of regulating compliance. NOTE: There must be explicit mention of modern slavery NOT Investment funds or banks have corporate social responsibility policies that require them to report on human rights UNLESS modern slavey forms part of this reporting.
2.1.5 Laws or policies prevent the import of goods and services made with forced labourThe government has prohibited the import of goods and services made with forced labour. For example, the US Tariff Act.
2.1.6 Laws are in place that make it a criminal offence for Company Directors or companies who fail to prevent modern slavery and failed to undertake reasonable due diligence in first tier supply chain.Directors can be charged and prosecuted for slavery in first tier supply chains where it can be shown that due diligence has not occurred. This indicator measures the existence of this provision in legislation.

Footnotes

1Clarke, R & Homel, R 1997, 'A Revised Classification of Situational Crime Prevention Techniques,' in: Andersen, O C A (ed.) Crime Prevention at a Crossroads. Ekblom, P & Tilley, N 2000, 'Going equipped: criminology, situational crime prevention and the resourceful offender,' British Journal of Criminology, 40. Lampe, K V 2011, 'The application of the framework of Situational Crime Prevention to 'organized crime,'' Criminology and Criminal Justice, vol. 11, pp. 145-163.
2United Nations 2000, Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, Doc. A/55/383, New York.
3International Labour Organization 2014, P029 - Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, 1930, Geneva.
4Council of Europe 2005, Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings, 16.V.2005, Warsaw.
5Bales, K 2007, Ending Slavery: How we Free Today's Slaves, University of California Press. Gallagher, A & Holmes, P 2008, 'Developing an Effective Criminal Justice Response to Human Trafficking: Lessons from the Frontline,' International Criminal Justice Review, vol. 18, pp. 318-348. Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons 2011, The 3 Ps: Prevention, Protection, Prosecution, U.S. Department of State. Available from: https://www.state.gov/j/tip/3p/. [19 September 2014].
6After three iterations of this assessment, we re-mapped our framework against the Council of Europe Convention Action against Trafficking Beings and have found there to be approximately 90 percent cross over with the European Convention. A paper describing this research is forthcoming at the time of publication.
7Commonwealth countries included are Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Belize, Dominica, Fiji, Grenada, Kiribati, Malta, Nauru, Saint Lucia, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Seychelles, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. Palau, a non-Commonwealth country, is also included for the first time.
8Identified using the 2016 Fragile States Index, where those countries that scored 10.0 on the Security Apparatus indicator were excluded. See http://fundforpeace.org/fsi/2016/06/27/fragile-states-index-2016-annual-report/.
9English, Spanish, Italian, French, German, and Chinese. Portuguese and Arabic speakers were missing from the team this year. The team’s background included law, international relations, international development, and American studies.
10Available at https://www.globalslaveryindex.org/data/.
11M4 1.4.3 and M4 1.8.1 were weighted as one activity given the role that corruption and state-imposed forced labour plays in undermining a government response
12As above.
13International Labour Organization & Walk Free Foundation 2017, Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: Forced Labour and Forced Marriage, Geneva. Available from: http://www.ilo.org/global/publications/books/WCMS_575479/lang--en/index.htm. [2 October 2017].
14International Labour Organization 2018, Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations. Available from: http://www.ilo.org/global/standards/applying-and-promoting-international-labour-standards/committee-of-experts-on-the-application-of-conventions-and-recommendations/lang--en/index.htm. [5 February 2018].
15International Labour Organization & Walk Free Foundation 2017, Global Estimates of Modern Slavery: Forced Labour and Forced Marriage, Geneva. Available from: http://www.ilo.org/global/publications/books/WCMS_575479/lang--en/index.htm. [2 October 2017].
16International Labour Organization 2018, NORMLEX: Information System on International Labour Standards. Available from: http://www.ilo.org/dyn/normlex/en/f?p=NORMLEXPUB:20010:0::NO:::. [2 February 2018].
17Not every country is required to report every year, with the eight fundamental and four priority conventions on a biennial cycle. Reports for all other conventions must be submitted every five years. See International Labour Organization 2018a, Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations. Available from: http://www.ilo.org/global/standards/applying-and-promoting-international-labour-standards/committee-of-experts-on-the-application-of-conventions-and-recommendations/lang--en/index.htm. [5 February 2018].
18Using for example UN treaty reports, regional reports such as GRETA, the US Trafficking in Persons Report, and credible media reports.